Susan Reviews The Baron Next Door by Erin Knightley

Posted: June 18, 2016 in Reviews
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

avatar S RED

I do a fair amount of Regency romance reading. I like the manners, like the play of wits, like the smolder. And the dresses; I’ll own up to that.

So when Jett sent me the link to The Baron Next Door, she wasn’t kidding when she mentioned that I’d already requested it from my local library. I have the best local library, I swear it, because they already had this new release on the shelves, and they pulled it off and held it just for me.

So we have the story of Charity Effington, who hasn’t had the best of luck finding a spouse among the ton. She broke off her engagement when she realized her to-be was in love with another woman and instead of being understanding about it, the ton decided to be scandalized. And Charity, of course, bore the brunt of that scandal.

What a nice way to thank her for doing the right thing.

And in the townhouse next door, we have the newly made Baron Cadgwith, in the town of Bath to try to find relief for the post-war injuries that would make anyone with sense commit suicide. Holy smoke, this poor guy suffers.

And that’s when and where this turns into Rock Fiction.

That’s because Charity lives and breathes music and her pianoforte. She is to music what some of the best rockers in modern-day fiction are. This woman can close her eyes and the music comes to her, unbidden. And with her cohort of two friends, they make music, indeed—and music with a goal, to perform in the first annual music festival in town.

Of course, her music sets the baron’s headaches off. And so begins the conflict and attraction, all rolled into one. Because the baron doesn’t care about a scandal that happened in some other town. He doesn’t care about much at first, caught up in his pain and misery (and really, who can blame him?).

But Charity catches his attention. And her music drives him away.

This is a romance, so we all know how it’ll end: happily. And for a time, the romance reads like every other romance, with the music fading into the background. But it also becomes a catalyst for action, understanding, and even the pronouncement of love.

Just like the best Rock Fiction out there.

Proving, once again, that Rock Fiction doesn’t have to include Rock and Roll to be Rock Fiction.

Advertisements
Comments
  1. dlmartin6 says:

    That sounds like a great read. I love Regency Romances as well!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s