Posts Tagged ‘dropout trope’

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Look what we have here! It’s new! It’s special!

It’s the first in a series. Here’s the description.

Cooper Krenshaw knows what it’s like to feel the bright lights upon him, the sound of the crowd roaring when he walks on stage; after all, he happens to be one of the biggest names in country music at the moment. And he has knowingly just dropped off the grid. The first decision he has made on his own in quite some time. Cooper only thought he was looking for a challenge when he walked off of that concert stage in Chicago. After finding himself in Devil’s Bend, Texas, he soon realizes that the dream he’s been chasing might not be the one he was after all along.

Now he’s found himself not only starting over in a new town, but he’s pretty sure he’s met the toughest challenge of his life… she just happens to be an angel in blue jeans.

Tessa Donovan hasn’t been the best of friends with Fate for quite some time now. Owning and operating The Rusty Nail, a small bar in her hometown of Devil’s Bend, has been enough to keep her going through the motions of her life. But it’s the only thing she’s got. After losing her husband fifteen short months after they were married, Tessa has spent the last four years chasing dreams in order to maintain her sanity. Only those dreams are soon ripped right out of her grasp by a sexy country music star who claims he descended on her small town by accident.

Coincidence? Or has Fate stepped in once again? Whatever the case, Tessa knows the handsome cowboy might get to overtake her dreams, but she’s bound and determined that he won’t take her heart.

Well, it may be a series, but there’s some fresh stuff happening here. He’s a dropout, which isn’t too terribly new, but I haven’t seen in awhile, so that’s good. And he’s a country star, which isn’t new either, but it’s not the cliche. And not a mention of how many groupies the man surrounds himself with — THAT is definitely new and welcome.

The heroine is the new kind of kick-ass woman: presumably widowed and a bar owner. Bar owners, historically in fiction, are tough women. So right there, it sounds like there might be some verbal fireworks before there are bedroom fireworks.

Bring this one on.

Oh, and the rest of the series? Hard to tell, as books three and four are only marked as untitled, but have a name beside them in parentheses. To judge by the second book, the series rounds out by following the rest of the band. The guy in the second book even follows Cooper to the same town and finds love in the same bar. Maybe it’s too much coincidence. Only one way to find out…

One more thing? These books seem to be about the men, not the women. Susan loves to tell the story of the agent who said she had to be writing about women because who’d want to read about men? Looks like all of Edwards’ books are at least a lot about the men. Susan’s not the only one who wants to read about men. I sure do.

Bring these on!

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Woot! Talk about a score (and don’t tell Susan, who’s bound to be jealous)! A NINE-BOOK SERIES. It’s one of those “each character in the band gets a book” (or two) themes, and that’s fine by me.

Book one, All Access, though, starts in a place we’ve been before. Oh, how many times: Jess doesn’t recognize the lead singer of Charing Cross. He’s just some stranger in a cafe who wants company (uhh, bring your security guy if you’re that recognizable? Why isn’t he mobbed? Where are the cell phones that’re being pointed at him? No one tells her she’s suddenly all over the place, with gossip mongers everywhere wondering who she is?)

The second book, Broken Sound, starts off just as familiar as the first, but it seems to deviate. Lead guitarist Davey finds out he’s a daddy. But then the story seems to take a left turn and the description doesn’t mention Davey as the father of Anna’s kid. So I’m confused on this one.

Book three, Bitter Farewell, is the “rock star goes in search of the girl from his past he left behind and shouldn’t have” storyline.

But Buried Notes, the fourth book? Now we’re talking. Secret marriage, time to sign the divorce papers. Of course, he can’t, but that’s okay.

Last Song is the dropout story. You know: the guy drops out of the band in search of something. In this case, it’s to quiet the “demons in his soul.” — Yeah, we’ve seen this one (most famously in Don DeLillo’s Great Jones Street, which is described as a satire, but somehow, I never read it that way). But it looks like James might take the story one step further and do good stuff with it.

Now, this is where it gets interesting. A Voice to Love is the sixth book in THIS series, but the first in ANOTHER. Wild, huh? Kinda confusing. But the fresh plots continue: this one’s got a rocker with a secret. Think Mick Mars, folks. We’ve moved into a different band now, too. One who was introduced in the dropout book.

And it goes on from there. Interesting stuff, and I like that James is taking chances with her plots. Yeah, some of them are familiar, but it looks like what she’s doing with them is new. And that’s what it’s about. Keeping the category new, keeping it fresh, pushing its boundaries.

I definitely gotta read these.