Posts Tagged ‘glad I read it’

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I’d heard a lot of great things about Melissa Foster’s books, so when she wrote a potential Rock Fiction entry into one of her series, I was all over it.

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I’m not sure what the fuss is.

Now, if you like those books where things don’t ever really go wrong, where people communicate and work through small problems super easy, where it’s a love fest from the second new people meet and families come together, this is totally your thing.

And I’m not one of those people who wallows in angst, but I’d like a little bit of tension and darkness in my books, you know? But when even the truffles are described as delicious after we’ve watched more than one character talk about how good they are, you know this isn’t the world’s most realistic version of reality.

By the end, it totally grated on my nerves. And I couldn’t tell anyone apart in the huge families of Trish and Boone.
So here’s the deal: Trish is an actress who expects this version of Sid and Nancy to get her an Oscar. And she fully expects this despite the fact that she’s going to be starring opposite Boone, who’s never acted and comes off as more than a boor. We’re told he’s a rock star, but there’s nothing rock star about him, despite the fact that he plays guitar a few times. It takes more than that. More than never-voiced worries about how a rocker and an actress can make it work.

So it’s got no real conflict and it’s not Rock Fiction. We’re striking out here.

Except it’s readable and until the end, when it goes over the top in family insta-love for each other, it’s a fun and good read. Perfect for the beach or for a day in a hammock in the backyard (thanks for buying that, Dad) when you don’t want to think or do anything but go along for the ride.

Bring your own delicious truffles, though.

Pick up your copy, and as always, thanks to Rock Star Lit for the review copy. If you’ve read it and want to share your own views, drop Susan a line!

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I do a fair amount of Regency romance reading. I like the manners, like the play of wits, like the smolder. And the dresses; I’ll own up to that.

So when Jett sent me the link to The Baron Next Door, she wasn’t kidding when she mentioned that I’d already requested it from my local library. I have the best local library, I swear it, because they already had this new release on the shelves, and they pulled it off and held it just for me.

So we have the story of Charity Effington, who hasn’t had the best of luck finding a spouse among the ton. She broke off her engagement when she realized her to-be was in love with another woman and instead of being understanding about it, the ton decided to be scandalized. And Charity, of course, bore the brunt of that scandal.

What a nice way to thank her for doing the right thing.

And in the townhouse next door, we have the newly made Baron Cadgwith, in the town of Bath to try to find relief for the post-war injuries that would make anyone with sense commit suicide. Holy smoke, this poor guy suffers.

And that’s when and where this turns into Rock Fiction.

That’s because Charity lives and breathes music and her pianoforte. She is to music what some of the best rockers in modern-day fiction are. This woman can close her eyes and the music comes to her, unbidden. And with her cohort of two friends, they make music, indeed—and music with a goal, to perform in the first annual music festival in town.

Of course, her music sets the baron’s headaches off. And so begins the conflict and attraction, all rolled into one. Because the baron doesn’t care about a scandal that happened in some other town. He doesn’t care about much at first, caught up in his pain and misery (and really, who can blame him?).

But Charity catches his attention. And her music drives him away.

This is a romance, so we all know how it’ll end: happily. And for a time, the romance reads like every other romance, with the music fading into the background. But it also becomes a catalyst for action, understanding, and even the pronouncement of love.

Just like the best Rock Fiction out there.

Proving, once again, that Rock Fiction doesn’t have to include Rock and Roll to be Rock Fiction.