Posts Tagged ‘incognito rocker trope’

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Well, THAT title pulls no punches, now does it? No one better complain they don’t know what they are getting when they pick this one up. And no one better complain about the detailed sex, either. It’s right there, in the title.

So what’s this erotic romance about? Let’s consult its description:

Evan: She has no idea who I really am. It’s the perfect situation. After an incident that causes me to re-evaluate my life, I’ve come here to escape the demands of my career. The last thing I expect to find is someone who doesn’t see me through the prism of my fame. But then I meet Audrey, who allows me to unleash lustful desires I’ve suppressed for years.

Audrey: He’s uncommonly sexy and brazenly confident. He’s exactly who I don’t need to meet at this point in my life, but I have no choice. Drawn in by his relentless seduction, I’m soon taking chances I never thought I’d take, shedding my fears and letting him over my protective walls. And there’s his unusual “rider list,” always surprising me, testing my limits, exploring our fantasies, leading to the most sensual experiences of my life.

What starts as a perfect distraction for both of us quickly becomes an entanglement of scorching hot sex, closely held secrets that could tear it all apart, and moments that will shape us for the rest of our lives.

So this is kinda familiar, in that rockers who are escaping and reevaluating are common heroes, and heroines who are drawn in by his magnetic pull. But what it doesn’t give us in this description is the assumption of the Happily Ever After. In fact, I kinda get the drift they’re gonna part at the end, happy and sexed up, but ready to go their own ways.

And I’m cool with that.

Of course, I’m also cool with the sex. Bring it ON, baby. I love good erotic fiction. I really do.

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Woot! Talk about a score (and don’t tell Susan, who’s bound to be jealous)! A NINE-BOOK SERIES. It’s one of those “each character in the band gets a book” (or two) themes, and that’s fine by me.

Book one, All Access, though, starts in a place we’ve been before. Oh, how many times: Jess doesn’t recognize the lead singer of Charing Cross. He’s just some stranger in a cafe who wants company (uhh, bring your security guy if you’re that recognizable? Why isn’t he mobbed? Where are the cell phones that’re being pointed at him? No one tells her she’s suddenly all over the place, with gossip mongers everywhere wondering who she is?)

The second book, Broken Sound, starts off just as familiar as the first, but it seems to deviate. Lead guitarist Davey finds out he’s a daddy. But then the story seems to take a left turn and the description doesn’t mention Davey as the father of Anna’s kid. So I’m confused on this one.

Book three, Bitter Farewell, is the “rock star goes in search of the girl from his past he left behind and shouldn’t have” storyline.

But Buried Notes, the fourth book? Now we’re talking. Secret marriage, time to sign the divorce papers. Of course, he can’t, but that’s okay.

Last Song is the dropout story. You know: the guy drops out of the band in search of something. In this case, it’s to quiet the “demons in his soul.” — Yeah, we’ve seen this one (most famously in Don DeLillo’s Great Jones Street, which is described as a satire, but somehow, I never read it that way). But it looks like James might take the story one step further and do good stuff with it.

Now, this is where it gets interesting. A Voice to Love is the sixth book in THIS series, but the first in ANOTHER. Wild, huh? Kinda confusing. But the fresh plots continue: this one’s got a rocker with a secret. Think Mick Mars, folks. We’ve moved into a different band now, too. One who was introduced in the dropout book.

And it goes on from there. Interesting stuff, and I like that James is taking chances with her plots. Yeah, some of them are familiar, but it looks like what she’s doing with them is new. And that’s what it’s about. Keeping the category new, keeping it fresh, pushing its boundaries.

I definitely gotta read these.