Posts Tagged ‘Lisa Gillis’

I was so excited to read this. Lisa Gillis! I’ve known her online in passing for years, although not terribly well. I’ve heard about her Rock Fiction for even longer and been dying to read the books to see if they were as good as I was led to believe they are.

I don’t remember how or when this came across my radar as a freebie, but I grabbed it. Because Lisa Gillis! WOOT.

But… it opens in a scenario reminiscent of Jessica Lemmon’s Return of the Bad Boy, only this doesn’t put me off the way that book put my buddy Jett off. She and I talked about it, and her memory of that one is that there was an anger between the characters in the Lemmon book, where here, we had a softness between the characters, a real chemistry and desire for each other. Their meeting came out of desire for each other as people, not as their job titles. And it came out of *desire* and not revenge or whatever had powered that opening in the Lemmon book.

This also reminded me of Stina Lindenblatt’s My Song For You, in that the rocker discovers his love has a hidden kid and he’s the dad. The situation is quite different, but there it is. And the kids in both these books have some sort of physical disability, too, although Gillis never gives us any details. She’s so careful about not revealing them that we never know what the issue is, or if she herself knows if this is a real, legit problem that parents have to face. Maybe it’s something made up for the sake of convenience.

So the book has these two others that it has to live up to, and by and large it does. Marissa and Jack are likeable, although we don’t see nearly enough of Jack as a rocker and can’t really consider this to be Rock Fiction. He’s not big enough, and while it makes sense that he tames that side of himself for the child’s sake, he also loses that spark that sets a rocker apart.

My biggest issue with it came in the editing. Holy hell. Talk about sinking a really good book. Marissa apparently is a child of the water or something because she’s got a naval something or other where most people have bellybuttons… or, more properly, NAVELs. Dialogue tags are used to tell us what’s been shown (so much for “show, don’t tell” although we did stop short of “Shit,” he swore — but not by much), and the words are often used incorrectly, as well. “She assures.” — that’s not a sentence. ASSURES is a verb that needs an object, yet this happened over and over again. Interestingly, a number of erudite words are used correctly, but they also don’t fit the characters, and since this is a first-person narration, the narrator’s voice needs to match that of the characters.

A lot is left to be developed further–the situations with the parents of both Jack and Marissa, for example, and for different reasons. Jack’s parents are the typical loving parents who hold the close-knit family together. Without knowing anything else about the series, I’d wager the series revolves around them and their family. Marissa’s family isn’t entirely the opposite, but it’s clear from the get-go that her mother is toxic and her father an enabler of that toxicity. Hopefully we’ll get to see Jack give them a true comeuppance, complete with severing of the mother-daughter relationship in future books.

But one thing nagged at me, and that’s in the beginning, where Marissa says she’s part of the famous JackMa. But this story doesn’t take us to any of the hows and whys of their *public* coupling, only their personal one. And I felt like the opening, with its talk on the first page of a perfect storm and an ending with this promise of their being a celebrity couple, promised more than it delivered.

So… would I read more Lisa Gillis? I think so. The woman can write some good sex, and maybe the editing in this one is not indicative of the rest of Gillis’ body of work. I really hope it’s not because the woman clearly can write, she creates very vivid and real characters, and there’s a lot going on here that I’d like to see how it unfolds. But sheesh, she needs people who understand that cheesecakes aren’t pies, that buttercream is one word, and that you don’t need to consult a thesaurus to write well.

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avatar S RED

Even though I have yet to read any of Lisa Gillis’ books (anyone? Want to send me a review?), I follow her on Facebook. So I found this and figured I’d pass it along, although time’s running short.

Only through today, you can check a sale on a whole slew of Rock Fiction. Some sound like they are free and some are 99c. I’ll let you explore, see what you like, what the deals are…

Just remember, if you pick any up — while on this sale or not — the best way to say thanks to the author is by leaving reviews. And if you post them anywhere, feel free to send ’em to me, too, with links back to you (If you have and/or want any) so I can give you proper credit and props.

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It’s funny. Susan says she and Lisa Gillis are buds on social media, but neither of us have read any of Lisa’s books. It’s nothing personal. For me, it’s time. For Susan, it’s finances (and time, she claims).

The bummer in all this is that Lisa keeps writing new stuff, so we’re falling farther and farther behind. And that is extra bad because the new book, A Shit Storm, builds on the what’s come already. Check it for yourself:

Tristan Loren, son of former rock star Jack Storm, is the first to admit he’s lived a privileged life.

However, the top schools, the best games, phones, and cars, the motocross track winding around the back acreage of his family home, and the finest of whatever his heart desires has come with strangers yelling for his attention and camera flashes in his face. Even though his father retired the spotlight and moved the family from L.A., their lives are rarely incognito.

His classmates have visions of college life in the fall following senior year, while his fantasy is a normal existence. Whatever normalcy is, he’s sure it’s not graduating with honors–and an unopened condom in his billfold.

Aside from having a paranoid mom who makes it her mission to see that he’s never alone with a girl, he wants his first time to be with someone who doesn’t know him as Jack Storm-of-the-multi-platinum-Jackal Junior.

Chasing the vision of a woman and a world who doesn’t know of him takes him from the sunshiny suburbs of Dallas to the snowy streets of Detroit.

When he sees Sash in person, the girl he’s texted, phoned, and Skyped for the better part of a year, he’s drawn to her secret smile, and the tattooed half sleeves decorating her arms. Her fiery, fun demeanor and musical skills make her seem the soul mate he’s been seeking.

But Sash has her own secrets—secrets that make him wish he’d never met her. Falling for Sash and finding his own identity may cost him more than what’s in his wallet.

A Shit Storm can stand alone but for fans of Six Silver Strings Series, this novel is the first in the E-String Set and includes scenes with characters from G-Strings and D-Strings.

I love that this is the story of the kid of rock and roll. I think I wrote up another book that had this focus — bring it, folks. It’s a good, valid topic in the Rock Fiction world. These are stories that need to be told.

Lisa Gillis and I have started crossing paths via social media more and more often of late. I’m not arguing; I love having cool people in my life.

Her first in the Silver Strings G series has come across my radar and since I don’t recall having blogged about it before, here we go.

Marissa is a craps dealer, and in one quick second that she never wants to remember, her life turns to crap. Her best friend convinces her that the cure for a breakup is a hookup, and reluctantly, she heeds this advice.

However, Jack (what was his name again?) is not the average girl’s revenge sex.

Jack is a celebrity in his niche of the music world. Women throw themselves at him, toss their lingerie on the stage, and scream his name. Marissa has no idea of his public identity, and while she does not initially throw herself at him, she does go on to toss aside her lingerie and ultimately scream his name.

Five minutes after parting, Marissa holds no illusions about seeing him again, but does vow a new outlook on her life and herself.

Five days later, they exchange a very short text.

Five months later, Jack astounds her with an invitation to Los Angeles. Although Jack is now a star in her very non rock star fantasies, Marissa is concealing a huge secret that prevents her from accepting.

Five years later, the secret comes out and despite the conflicting emotions each feels towards the another, they must meld their two worlds together.

Hmm. Big Secret Trope. I’ve seen them done well, and I’ve seen them done badly, and I’ve seen everything in between.

The frustration here is that I haven’t read anything of Lisa’s yet. I want to talk about how confident I am with how she’ll handle this, but … I can’t.

Gotta read it and see, I suppose. And what better place to start than the start of the series? There’s even a series of short stuff meant to enhance the experience, Storm Cells. Reminds me of … well, the Demo Tapes series. Go figure.

One final note… there are comments over at GoodReads about these books needing a better editor. There’s always room on my client list for a Rock Fiction author whose social media world overlaps mine…