Posts Tagged ‘Susan Griscom’

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Back in Rocktober, Susan Griscom sent me a review copy of her two Beaumont Brothers books, Beautifully Wounded and Beautifully Used. Took me awhile to get through them, and I already reviewed Beautifully Wounded. I think the fact that it’s not Rock Fiction had me dragging my heels about getting Beautifully Used read … and then reviewed. I finished it awhile ago. Like a month or so.

But I take good notes. So let’s get to it:

Beautifully Used is the story of one of the minor characters in Beautifully Wounded, Jackson’s brother Brodie. Brodie’s your classic male slut and although I kept wondering why word never got out in this small town they purportedly live in about what a slut he was, the girls kept coming around. I don’t know. I’ve never been the type to seek out the easy lays, and it’s not like Brodie had the freedom to go chase tail: as a bartender, he’s pretty much locked into a fixed location. That’s why I wonder why word never got out about him.

And then, in the first book, he meets Gabrielle, the best friend of his brother’s girl. For Brodie, it’s lust at first sight, of course. Gabrielle isn’t so sure.

Which is why Lena and Jackson push them repeatedly into close quarters as they wind up essentially being the last-minute go-fers for Lena and Jackson’s wedding. Lena’s so glad to have her friend around, but in her pre-wedding Bridezilla self-obsession doesn’t spend that much time with her friend. Jackson, likewise, is absent. So it’s Gabby and Brodie and yeah, there’s no hope for them. We know they’ll be together.

The conflict comes in a way that’s too similar to the first book, too. Stalkers, confrontations in the woods, almost deaths. Brodie’s habits are less of an issue than this stalker-dude, and Gabby’s horrific past is dealt with way too easily.

While there’s more music in this one — the band goes on the road for a show, in a pretty implausible way (but it’s still fun — I have stress that. It’s fun) — it’s still not Rock Fiction. There’s not enough music, not enough of the right elements that push these people from being people into being stars. They’re just people who make music.

So. Lots of negatives here. And yeah, there are. But like the first book, this is a fun, easy read. It’s perfect for a day on the beach, a time when you want to escape into someone else’s life and see that they have it as tough, if not tougher, than you do, but at the same time, their problems aren’t insurmountable.

Not every book has to be lofty, not every book has to tackle the big issues. Sometimes, easy breezy is the way to go, and with that, Griscom delivers in spades. It’s a good escapist couple of hours, and I’m glad I read these.

Huge thanks to Susan Griscom (as opposed to our site owner, Susan) for sharing her books.

Susan Griscom was nice enough to send a digital copy of her book, Beautifully Wounded, and let me start by saying it’s a good read. But it’s not Rock Fiction.

Why not? Well, because it takes more than a scene with a woman playing a guitar and talk about making music to be Rock Fiction. To cross the line into Rock Fiction, music has to permeate the book somehow. It’s got to be central, but in Beautifully Wounded, what’s central is the struggle of Lena to get away from her abusive husband, emotionally as well as physically.

That part of the book is well done, near as I can tell. I wonder if someone who’s escaped an abusive husband would agree ’cause maybe, Lena falls for Jackson too fast. But maybe Lena’s one of those women who needs to be in a relationship. And that’s the biggest problem I have with this book: Lena’s needy and in denial about it. Oh, and she’s not terribly screwed up by the abuse. You’d think she would be, right?

But there’s a sweetness to this book. It unfolds slowly, like the author’s taking care of us the same way Jackson takes care of Lena. Not slow like it’s draggy and hard to keep reading. It’s actually leisurely and pretty much just right. Oh, sure, there’s the cliché confrontation at the end, but c’mon. What other end can there be when you’re dealing with an abusive spouse? How else can there be closure?

Real life isn’t that neat, but that’s why fiction is good stuff. Sometimes, it’s good to know it can be, and it fits this book pretty well.

I’d say this one’s worth a read but not if you’re looking for Rock Fiction.

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Woot!

I want to say Susan’s done it again, but for a change, she’s been the go-between (control, much? Nah. She filters the mail so I have more time to read and review. Right?). And now she’s heard from author Louisa Bacio, the one who wrote the cool story about the rocker touring the bomb shelter. The one that I couldn’t even start to talk about because I was so jazzed to read it.

I’m still reading Susan Griscom’s first book, Beautifully Wounded. I mentioned that Susan Griscom (not our Rock Fiction Expert Susan) was nice enough to send over copies of the books. So I’ll take a break after I finish that one, read The Big One, and then finish off Susan Griscom’s (sheesh. I can’t even go Susan G. One of you needs a cool name like Jett.) second and we’ll be doing reviews until this place implodes. Which I hope isn’t soon because baby, I am all about the Rock Fiction.

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So Susan came across another Rock Fiction author named Susan — Susan Griscom. Go check out Susan Griscom’s site.

See those two books? The Beaumont Brothers Duology?

YES. Susan’s busy with a client (read this post at West of Mars if you don’t know what she’s up to), so I get these two ALL TO MYSELF.

I love this gig.

I’ll report in when I’ve read them.

Oh, here’s the description for the first:

What would you do if you had no place to go and no one you could trust?

“The lyrics are about you, Lena,” he confessed, and I watched his mouth as the tip of his tongue moistened his lips before he leaned his head down. Then those beautiful lips were on mine, soft, tender at first, then his tongue glided over my lips, breaking the seal. My pulse throbbed and quickened as his tongue swirled around mine. Taking and controlling, and… and I wanted this, needed his touch. I went limp in his embrace, and the heat rose under my skin, my body vibrated against his strong powerful one. Was this really happening?”

After a not-so-wonderful young adulthood-shuffled from one foster home to another-Lena Benton had hoped marriage would be her ticket to happiness. Wedded a year after high school graduation, Lena was certain she’d found her knight. But when Troy Harington’s true colors surface shortly after their glorious day of elopement, things aren’t quite as rosy as Lena had envisioned. When an unforeseen event turns ugly, all she can do is … run!

But does she run far enough?

Jackson Beaumont prides himself on being a nature-loving, guitar-strumming carefree sort of guy, known for his eagerness to help injured animals find their way back into the wild. When Lena Benton walks into his bar, he’s once again swept off his feet with concern and desire to help the wounded. Will he risk having his heart torn apart again when the memory of the fawn he rescued as a child resurfaces?