Posts Tagged ‘Thanks for the review copy’

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It’s difficult to take a cast of unlikeable characters and make the reader care about them. Not all readers are willing to rise to the challenge, and that’s okay. The payout for those of us who are is bigger somehow.

Lisa Marie Perry has a cast of some tough characters. All of them are morally deficient in one way or another; all of them have seriously fatal flaws. In fact, it’s hard to believe this was published by one of the big houses, but it was. Good for them.

The set-up is pretty fascinating: the central player here isn’t a person so much as a record label. And we can argue the usefulness and relevance of record labels until the Spotify Premium’s up for renewal, but that’s not what Sin For Me is about. It’s about the people who used to control it (Dante and Delilah) and the people who currently do (Emma, Joshua, and Chelsea)—and the betrayals and baggage that remain as Delilah wants her family’s heritage back.

That’s the big story arc. There’s also a smaller one, in that it’s about the relationship between Dante and Chelsea. There was a betrayal between them as well, and it was part of the bigger betrayal that led to the leadership change at Devil’s Music. But it’s that betrayal between Dante and Chelsea that’s just as hard, if not harder, to get past. Dante copes by leaving town and starting life at the farthest point he can get to from the glitz and glamour of the record business. Chelsea, though, isn’t so lucky. She’s stuck in the executive offices, busy self-destructing and stuck in the guilt and anger of what she and Dante did to each other, surrounded by the constant reminders of him and the family legacy that she took from him.

This is enough for a single book, sure, but there’s a couple more subplots, as well: Delilah wants to make a play to get her label back and decides to use Dante to do it; one of the label’s artists is angry and turns first rogue and then violent; and a new talent comes into the fold. And, too, there’s something going on between married Emma and Joshua, something Chelsea doesn’t understand—and neither does the audience.

It’s almost too much, except there’s something soap opera-esque going on here, and the book certainly reads well. I found I had to read in small doses because the characters are so morally vapid, I’d have to resurface just to recalibrate myself. But at the same time, it was hard to put down (yes, it’s true: the famous editor loves trashy, soap opera-esque books as much as she loves everything else her clients throw at her. Maybe more? I’m not telling!).

This, friends, is the sign of a good book. It’s a train wreck you can’t look away from, a delicious taste of something forbidden. But best of all, the book itself isn’t a train wreck. It’s well crafted and constructed, the characters are beautifully drawn, and it’s well written. The various strands of the plot are well cared for in Perry’s experienced hands, and wow, does she do a great job with it.

But if there’s one area where the book isn’t as strong, it’s in the descriptions. I wanted a better view of what these people wear—telling me the sandals are diamond-studded doesn’t really show me much—as well as how this old house has become a record label, with stairs and offices and… just how does this place lay out and work? It was hard to visualize and I had a hard time making sense of what was where.

After all the rich plotting that happens here, I really missed the rich descriptions to go with the lushness of the characters. Here’s one book that demands more than just a broad brushstroke of description. It needs to breathe the way the rest of the story does.

Even before the cliffhanger ending—I hesitate to call it a cliffhanger because it doesn’t leave us on our toes at the edge of the world so much as it merely stops, the last page gets turned and you look up and wonder where the hell the rest of it is—I was hooked on this series. Morally absent or not, I’m dying to know what comes next for our salacious crew, and how they solve the problems that have been laid out in this first volume of The Devil’s Music.
October, when the second book is released, can’t come soon enough.

*Copy from NetGalley, and thanks for it! Can’t wait for #2*

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Here’s the thing about Rock Fiction: if you don’t get the details right, you pretty much shoot yourself in the foot. The world building here matters because those of us in the know, those of us with industry background, will call you out.

And that’s the fatal problem with The Backstage Pass: The Complete Series (read as a box set and thanks to NetGalley for the chance to read it). The details of a touring band are so far off, it’s impossible to suspend disbelief for even a minute.

First off, I’ve never heard of any tour naming their tour busses. I even checked with a number of friends who currently have their hands in tours. Nope. That’s a new one.

The opening act is its own thing. It doesn’t travel as part of the band’s entourage. The headliner doesn’t pick up the expense of the opening act. Touring with a headliner is a privilege; why would the headliner pick up an expense they don’t need to? Profit margins on the road are slim enough as it is.

Band and crew doesn’t eat together. Not as one big happy family, anyway. There may be some overlap, but the two do such different jobs that… yeah, no. Besides, a band as big as this boy band is supposed to be is going to eat very differently than the crew. There are also no dressing room riders anywhere.

The authors of this series need to learn a thing or three about what a bunk in a tour bus really is. Sit up? Comfortable space for two? At first, I thought there were multiple busses, each with a bedroom in the back. It was the only explanation for how these so-called bunks would work.

I about threw my e-reader across the room when Ryder and his love interest spent the night at the arena, in their private dressing room. I still can’t get my brain around that. Spending the night in the arena?

Seriously. That one, right there, did it. Any authority the authors had flew out the window. You’re a headlining act and won’t extend the cost for a hotel room, especially when you do it at other times? Let me rephrase: you’re the headlining act.

Beyond the fact that spending the night in the bowels of an arena is creepy as hell, it’s crossed so far into fantasy that my brain keeps exploding, the more I think about it.

The worst part is that it kept going. We’re supposed to buy that the GED tutor—who herself is a teenager, which again stretches credibility—has this amazing voice and magically becomes an opening act, with no record, no label, no fan base, no manager, not even a demo?

And why does this tour feel like a dumping ground for teenage girls in sundresses who can’t be at home for the summer?

Then the daughter of the bodyguard gets stood up by her band member sorta-boyfriend and instead of reaching out to her father, who is with the band, just assumes the worst and runs away. Yeah. Real smart there, kid. And how about the fact that we never once see the father be fatherly? And then we learn that no, he’s the biggest victim in the family drama that’s kept him from being a good father, but he still doesn’t do a thing to try to fix his relationship with his daughter by, you know, trying to get to know her. Instead, all he does is issue edicts about how she’s not allowed to do this or that.

And, of course, the biggest signal of all: tour manager and manager are two entirely different jobs, and they don’t overlap for a very good reason. When I see that in Rock Fiction, I know right off that we’re dealing with someone who hasn’t taken the time to learn what needs to be learned. In this series, the manager is of course a slimy loser jerk. While there’s a reason the roadie nickname for tour manager is asshole, that doesn’t mean how the tour manager acts toward the band. It means how the tour manager acts on behalf of the band. At things like settlement after a show. Because, you know, the band is essentially his employer. And take note of essentially there. It’s a lot more nuanced than that.

Add in bad editing, both in each book—sorry, but “he ratchet his brain” isn’t even close—and across the series—if you’re going to italicize the stupid bus names in two of the books, do it in all of them—and… yeah. This reads more like Rock Fantasy, not Rock Fiction.

One last note: when I was Skyping with Susan and venting about the errors, her daughter came in the room and listened. “Sounds like every other Rock Fiction on Wattpad,” she said with a shrug. “That’s why I don’t read it.”
Sorry, folks. In a category where there’s so much good, this one’s a pass. If you want really good YA Rock Fiction, look to Sarra Manning’s Guitar Girl, or Nick and Norah, or Fat Kid Rules the World. And those are just off the top of my head. I bet if I searched the archives here at The Rock of Pages, I’d find more. I bet you would, too.

This was one we got via NetGalley, and if you can’t tell this is my honest review, well, I got nothing for you. It sucks when Rock Fiction lets me down in such an epic fashion. It really does.

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Every time I open a new book, I do it with the expectation that I’m going to love it and it’s going to be great.

Maybe I need to get over that. Because Under the Spanish Stars is one of those books that’s a good read, a strong story, and almost alive with the flamenco culture that frames the story, but… it didn’t knock my socks off.

It’s the story of Charlotte, who goes on a quest given to her by her sick grandmother to discover the history of a painting that means the world to the grandmother. And in alternating chapters, we get not only the story of Charlotte’s quest but also the story of the grandmother.

Abuela’s story is fascinating. As in many of these flashback novels, it’s the better half of the book. The flamenco culture is something that was new to me, and I totally dug it. I wanted more of it, in fact: more description, more of the music. I wanted it to breathe and throb off the page and swallow me whole, the way the best Rock Fiction does.

It didn’t.

But it came close. And for that, we give it props.

This can’t be easy stuff to write about. When you write about a rock band on an arena tour, it’s easy. Most music lovers know what’s up. It’s so much easier to pretend we’re there in the crowd, worshipping the singer or the guitarist or the bassist or the drummer. Most of us have been to concerts. We know how it goes.

And that’s part of why we gotta give Sinclair props. She did her best, describing the opening steps, the stomping feet, the speed of the music, the sweat, the beautiful lines of an arm raised overhead. She almost transported me there.

I bet the reason I failed was more me and less Sinclair. Because I didn’t have that frame of reference; the closest I come is one of the Dancing with the Stars dances, and… even if the characters didn’t tell us, we’d know the two aren’t even close.

Maybe the problem wasn’t the book so much as the reader.

But back to the story itself, and… yeah, still disappointed in it. I wanted more of the culture, especially in the history part. I wanted more of Granada, too, because it’s so different from my life. I feel like I got a quick peek, just enough to tantalize me but not enough to immerse me. And I wanted to be immersed.

This is one I’d say is worth the read. The story is good. It’s solid, if a bit predictable. I’ve gone on about things being at stake in a lot of books I’ve been reading lately, and I kinda feel like this one has the same problem. Not enough is at risk, and the problems that Charlotte faces are fixed too easily. It almost winds up painting Charlotte as a jerk for worrying so much about them, and no one wants the main character to be a jerk. You know?

Pick it up for the Flamenco. Stay for the past history. And just go for the ride with the present day because even though it’s the weakest part, it’s still a nice read.

Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for letting me have a read! Seriously. Pick this one up and tell me what you think. It released on December 8, which was just a few days ago. Grab it now. Help it boost its First 90 Day Sales count!

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Holy typos, you guys. I’ve heard Susan complain all the time that authors complain she’s too expensive, but you gotta hire someone or else be ready for me to make fun of you for thinking JACKAL AND HYDE is a thing. Like… wow.

And that’s not the sort of intro you want for a review, is it? But there it is. Just… wow.

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This sucks because Melody of Truth gets off to a fantastic start (one that’s light on the typos, which actually get worse as the book goes along). I was totally into it.

Melody’s a documentary filmmaker, a famous one. Think Bruce Sinofsky famous. More famous than Penelope what’s-her-name, who did the Decline of Western Civilization movies.

And Melody gets hired to make a documentary about… a band? A solo artist? This winds up being the first of a lot of details that are either confusing or make no sense. But Melody’s there to make a film and she’s got this insta-lust with the drummer, Sean.

Brownie points for giving the rocker a normal name. Although is it normal, or is it abnormal, since what’s normal has turned into the bizarre names?

Anyway, Sean’s there. And so are other guys in the band. And then the focus is on him and Melody and their relationship and sometimes, I’m not sure if there’s a band happening and a movie getting made, or if it’s all just a convenient backdrop for this romance.

Now, if you’ve got issues about cheating, this book isn’t for you. Melody, it turns out, is engaged to this guy and from the get-go, it’s clear she’s not in love with him. She’s settling. And that’s okay at first. People settle.

But people also meet the partner who sets them on fire, and Melody finds that in Sean, and she’s got a dilemma, but not really because she wants Sean and she admits that nope, Marco doesn’t do a damn thing for her. And then, long after things start to smell, we learn that Marco’s pretty much a cliché and so we don’t really feel bad that Melody essentially cheated on him by sleeping with Sean when she was engaged to Marco.

Like I said, if you have issues, this isn’t the book for you.

I like the concept of finding a love who you just can’t stay away from, everything practical be damned. I love the opening. I just wish it had been more: more Rock Fiction, more documentary, more explanation about the band, more detail, even more originality where Marco was concerned. I mean, a poet? With no day job? Really?

I don’t know if I’m getting picky lately, or if there’s just been a streak of stuff that’s not doing it for me. Either way, I’m still hunting for more authors like Cecilia Tan for me and Jessica Topper for Susan. You know: the authors we rave about to anyone who’ll listen. Not that I corner people on airplanes when I see them with a book. Nope. Not me.

Grab yourself a copy. Got a different opinion of this book? Send your review and Susan will get it posted for you.
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Susan dropped me a note that she’d gotten approval for the new Stina Lindenblatt novel. You know: the follow-up to This One Moment, which was a book I’d really liked. I was pretty darn excited to get my hands on My Song For You. Which band member was this going to be about?

Turns out it’s Jared’s story. He runs into the little sister of an old flame, and she’s got a kid.

Now, he looks at this kid and there’s not a flash of recognition, even though the kid apparently looks exactly like him. Not even when he grabs a picture of himself at age four, which is Logan’s age, does he get it. He keeps telling himself he never slept with Callie, so there’s no way. But he never stops to think beyond that.

Our Jared’s a little slow. Or maybe he’s distracted by Callie, who’s always had a thing for him but he never knew it. And maybe he liked Callie better than he let on, but he was busy with Callie’s older sister—and man, was he crushed when she told him she’d aborted their kid.

You guessed it, huh? Big sister Alexis lied. She had the kid and swore her family to secrecy. Not long after, Alexis and her parents died in a car accident, leaving Callie to raise her nephew, realigning her life plans and struggling to get by.

It’s a good setup, but it’s not enough. Callie and Jared don’t talk about the situation. Jared goes running to a lawyer behind everyone’s back and this lawyer dude ain’t real smart ’cause he doesn’t focus one whit on what’s best for this kid, who has no reason to think the only mother he can remember is really his aunt. And Jared? Doesn’t stop to consider Callie. He’s too busy being… well, not quite angry because he’s not passionate enough, but he’s being an idiot, that’s for sure. He wants to man up to his responsibility and that’s admirable, but he seems short on people around him who he’ll talk to, and who will widen his too-narrow viewpoint. And this includes his parents.

As for Callie, she gets scared and shuts down. And that’s how these two deal with this pretty big problem they’ve got. They don’t.

There’s not a lot of music in this book, to be honest. Jared isn’t the most dynamic character; he’s not got that charisma that Tyler/Nolan had in the first book of the series. He’s one of those guys who could be an everyman. It’s disappointing.

And so are the music details that do appear. You don’t meet with a music video director one day and begin recording the next. There’s no way this band would defy the micromanaging head of the label and change up the songs they had committed to play on a TV showcase special.

This doesn’t mean it wasn’t a good read. And okay, maybe it wasn’t good in the same way the first was. Too many chapters end the same way: with Jared telling us he’s an idiot. After the first couple, it’s a yawner. The potential for a really rich, rewarding story is there, but because Callie and Jared don’t talk through the big issues, this really readable book loses a lot of the high marks it could have otherwise had.

Let’s write this one off to a sophomore slump and hope the next in the series is about Mason, the foul-mouthed dude. Right now, he’s the guy I’m most interested in.

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I’d heard a lot of great things about Melissa Foster’s books, so when she wrote a potential Rock Fiction entry into one of her series, I was all over it.

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I’m not sure what the fuss is.

Now, if you like those books where things don’t ever really go wrong, where people communicate and work through small problems super easy, where it’s a love fest from the second new people meet and families come together, this is totally your thing.

And I’m not one of those people who wallows in angst, but I’d like a little bit of tension and darkness in my books, you know? But when even the truffles are described as delicious after we’ve watched more than one character talk about how good they are, you know this isn’t the world’s most realistic version of reality.

By the end, it totally grated on my nerves. And I couldn’t tell anyone apart in the huge families of Trish and Boone.
So here’s the deal: Trish is an actress who expects this version of Sid and Nancy to get her an Oscar. And she fully expects this despite the fact that she’s going to be starring opposite Boone, who’s never acted and comes off as more than a boor. We’re told he’s a rock star, but there’s nothing rock star about him, despite the fact that he plays guitar a few times. It takes more than that. More than never-voiced worries about how a rocker and an actress can make it work.

So it’s got no real conflict and it’s not Rock Fiction. We’re striking out here.

Except it’s readable and until the end, when it goes over the top in family insta-love for each other, it’s a fun and good read. Perfect for the beach or for a day in a hammock in the backyard (thanks for buying that, Dad) when you don’t want to think or do anything but go along for the ride.

Bring your own delicious truffles, though.

Pick up your copy, and as always, thanks to Rock Star Lit for the review copy. If you’ve read it and want to share your own views, drop Susan a line!

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I gotta give Susan props. When she sent over word that Cecilia Tan was going to be releasing the second book in her Secrets of a Rock Star series, she also included the note that she had the NetGalley widget for it.

So maybe it’s not right that I’m coveting this book. Because, you know, I’ve got a review copy pending.

But on the other hand, YOU should be coveting this book. Go and preorder it now if you can, from your favorite retailer (and remember: shop independent when you can, and there are other stores besides the Big A to buy books from). And then, on August 2, it’ll be in your hot hands and you can read it, too.

What’s it about? Oh, who CARES? This is Cecilia Tan, it’s the second in a series after a book I adored, and it’s Cecilia Tan!

But if you need to know, here’s the description:

Gwen Hamilton is always looking for a thrill. Not even running a secret BDSM club can fulfill her true desires. It’s only when she’s backstage at a rock concert and attracts the eye—and experienced hands—of guitarist Mal Kennealy that she finds that perfect combination of danger and excitement she’s been craving. Calling herself “Excrucia,” she revels in his uncompromising dominance each night. And yet by day, he knows her only as Gwen, his new escort for public appearances.

Excrucia blows Mal’s mind with her enthusiastic submission to his harshest commands. Even though he has a reputation for never seeing the same woman twice, he can’t help being tempted by the woman willing to fulfill his every fantasy. And when Mal discovers that Gwen—the sweet arm candy designed to soften his surly public image—is really Excrucia, he never wants to let her go. Finally he can indulge his absolute power. But dancing too recklessly on the razor’s edge could cut deeper than he bargained for . . .

Seriously. Preorder it. And watch this space for my review. Whee! Can’t wait!

Let’s welcome Michelle Smart today, who’s turning our own words back on us in a brilliant guest post about her book, Talos Claims the Virgin. Look for a review to come, once Jett and I stop fighting over it and start reading. Thanks to Michelle for sending us a review copy!!

Talos Claims His Virgin
Guest Post by
Michelle Smart

“If you go by the title alone, this sounds like one of those really bad romances people make fun of…”

So said this very blog! And when I read this same blog, and saw the postscript asking if anyone knew anything about it, I couldn’t resist tweeting that I know a *lot* about this book. Because I wrote it! Alas, I didn’t title it. Nope, that’s one aspect of writing for Harlequin that’s completely out of the author’s realm of control. But I don’t care because I get total control on the best bit, namely the actual book itself!

Of all the books I’ve written, Talos Claims His Virgin is my absolute favourite. A lot of it is down to the hero, the aforementioned Talos, and much of it is down to the heroine being a violinist. I played the violin for years, learning it at school and making my way through the grades. I played for my school orchestra and when I left, I switched from classical to folk music, playing in Irish folk bands right until I had my eldest child. Now I play only for my own pleasure. I’d always wanted to write a book with a violin playing heroine and for a long time I’d had a story floating in my mind of a huge brute of a man bursting in on a shy violinist hiding herself away in a practice room and declaring that she’s the musician he’d been searching for. I just needed to figure out who this brute of a man was and who the violinist was.

So… Talos… my inspiration for him came from watching Game of Thrones. Khal Drogo anyone? For non-Game of Thrones peeps out there, do a search for Jason Momoa. Alternatively, visit my pinterest board where you will find many examples of his magnificence!

As for Amalie, I knew that even though she was seemingly shy, she had a core of steel that made her more than a match for Talos. Music is the medium that brings them together, and it’s through music that they first shag each-other’s brains out and then fall in love (after hating each other first, obviously – well, it is a romance!).

Indeed, music features heavily throughout the book. When Talos first meets her, she’s alone playing Massenet’s Meditation de Thais (there’s a clip of Sarah Chang playing it on my pinterest board too). Talos’s grandmother was a violinist and composer, and now that she’s died, he’s tasked Amalie with learning her final, unpublished, composition, and mastering it in time for his grandfather’s Jubilee celebrations. Did I mention that Talos is a prince…?

My thanks to Susan and Jett for hosting me here today – it’s been a joy! x

Michelle, you are awesome. Drop in here ANYtime. Seriously. You rock. And roll. And play violin. Lindsay Sterling, anyone?

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So…. while Susan was out healing from her eye injury… well, hell. It’s an EYE she hurt, right? She said she was back at work and probably was, and probably was kicking ass like usual (Hey, Rock Fiction authors? Here’s an editor for you! Tell your friends!), but she said that she wanted to save her screen time for when she was working.

I feel kinda guilty ’cause her income’s gone down the toilet with the injury. I told her not to blog about it, but did she listen?

Well, I can’t brag and feel too superior.

Susan got e-mail from author Crystal Firsdon. Seems a certain someone wrote up a Coveting post and was all full of herself because the Big Boss wasn’t watching over her shoulder and …

Maybe Susan’s right to keep looking over my shoulder.

The book I talked about here? ALMOST WRECKED. That’s the title. ALMOST WRECKED.

(Note from Susan, who’s looking over Jett’s shoulder again: I changed the title in the post.)

Now, Crystal’s a class act, so we’ll keep her here at The Rock of Pages and not exile her to some desert island with an accordion player who only knows one polka. Not only did she nicely point out my mistake. Not only did she tell us that the second book in the series, ALMOST ORDINARY, is out. Not only did she consider writing a guest blog post for us here on these pages (saving you from reading yet more of my mistakes), she sent review copies.

Crystal, you are my new hero. If I promise to never screw up again, can we be besties?

Pick up a copy of ALMOST WRECKED. And then send us your reviews. And then get ALMOST ORDINARY and do it again.

Support the class acts.

Oh, and Crystal? Sorry about that… but not really. Because, you know, you and Susan got to meet. And review copies. And maybe guest blogging. And more exposure for you.

Not that this is going to be my new schtick. Can I blame it on being freaked out by the pictures of Susan’s eye that she kept sending me?

 

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So into my inbox pops a new-to-me author about to launch her first book, It’s a Long Way to the Top. It’s a male-male story, so it wasn’t for Jett, and let me tell you. I’m halfway through it and it is totally  knocking my socks off. Unless something happens between now and the end, expect another Rock of Pages Recommended Read!

 

Cherry was kind enough to send me the following blurb, and I’m more than pleased to post it for you.

 

Cherry Cox 

What’s it like to be a young, hot, talented, yet gay guitar god in a world that isn’t ready for gay?

 

Step back in time to 1985 where sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll rule the Sunset Strip, and where Jackson ‘Jax’ Reed and his band Acts of Insanity are forging their place in rock ’n’ roll history.

 

What can I say? I love rock music. I’ve always loved music. I’ve always loved rock music. Many years ago I even tried my luck as a vocalist in several rock music bands. The lifestyle was killer. Literally. It was hard on my mind and my body. It was also one of the greatest times of my life.

 

Fast forward to 2011. I was loading up my e-book reader with material to read on a long overseas journey when I came across my very first romance/erotica rock fiction book. And I was blown away. I’d just found a new passion. Subsequently, I downloaded all the romance/erotica rock fiction I could find.

 

I also knew I had to write my own story. And so I started tinkering with IT’S A LONG WAY TO THE TOP.

 

IT’S A LONG WAY TO THE TOP takes a behind the scenes look at a band navigating their way through the industry, and at a lead guitarist who is struggling with his sexuality.

 

 

“Well, let me tell you this rock star – the world isn’t ready for a gay guitar god, you understand me? The world isn’t ready for gay. One word of this gets out, one whiff of suspicion, and it’s over. Do you understand that?”

 

 

Melissa Cleeman, Senior Editor at Busy Bird Publishing, had this to say:

 

Raw, sexy, electrifying. A world where music is God and Rock n’ Roll is a religion, Cherry Cox delivers the sounds, smells and tastes that is the 80s rock era.

Jax is an unforgettable character, leading you down the dark slivers of the industry as he struggles to accept himself in a world that’s not yet ready to. I swayed from wanting to comfort him, slap him, jam with him, and fuck him.

Cox has captured the sexual tension and chemistry between Jax and Harley brilliantly, leading the way for a partnership that has to succeed in more ways than one. Each scene made me feel like I was there in the moment, whether that was being part of the band and playing music, to being in the corner of a seedy bar, reeking of booze and itching for my next fix.

Acts of Insanity paves the way to a new genre, where rock and sex come together in a spectacular way. I can’t remember the last time I read a story where I was so emotionally invested in the characters, and their plight, I just kept coming back for more!

 

 

Now, a year after I began tinkering with the concept, IT’S A LONG WAY TO THE TOP has finally hit the shelves. If you want a real, raw, and gritty story about sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll, if you want to know about Jax’s journey, then IT’S A LONG WAY TO THE TOP is the answer to your rock fiction prayer.

 

But be warned, it is not for the faint-hearted.

 

Available Rocktober 21 – KINDLE, AUDIO, PRINT & iBOOK

 

For more info go to:

Paperback Pleasures

http://www.paperbackpleasures.com

 

And join me on:

My website/blog

http://www.cherrycox.com

 

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/CherryCoxAuthor

 

Twitter

https://twitter.com/CherryCoxAuthor

 

READ AN INTERVIEW WITH THE BAND IN CHEAP SHOT MAGAZINE

http://www.paperbackpleasures.com/acts-of-insanity-series.html

 

 

 

SEE THE BAND’S ONE AND ONLY MUSIC VIDEO

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33z9e1c3GAo